The Power of Right Now

I've been embracing a mental shift lately and I have to tell you, it's really changing the way I do things. I've been thinking about power. The power to change. The power to improve. The power to achieve. The power to continue. There is an inherent strength in the word power, but how do you access it?

Many women I know seem to operate under this assumption that power is something that they have to get or build up like a muscle. Like it's something that is housed "somewhere else" and that it requires a lot of effort to go and get it. 

But here's what I've learned. Everyone has power. It's inside them. It always has been. It's not about finding it or building it, it's about accessing it. 

And the only time you can access it is right now. This very moment. Whatever moment it is for you, you can only access power now. I mean, think about it. Can you access power tomorrow? Possibly. But you won't know until tomorrow becomes right now. I know, it's kind of messing with my head, too. 

So, like I said, this has been on my mind lately and it's changing things for me little by little. I don't need to wait until I feel strong, or confident, or ready. I can do it now. Whatever the "it" is, I can. That's a lot of freedom. And a whole lot of permission that you can receive if you want it. 

You want to run a marathon? You can start right now. You want to write a novel? You can start right now. You want to launch your own business? You can start right now. You want to fall in love again and have your heart healed? You can start right now.

That's crazy right? Whatever starting looks like for you is perfectly fine. Maybe it's brainstorming a lead character in a screenplay you've always wanted to write. Maybe it's searching online for houses in that perfect neighborhood you want to live in. Maybe it's dusting off your running shoes and putting them by the door instead of hiding them under your bed. Whatever it is, do it. Because all you have is right now. You can't do it yesterday and tomorrow is always a day away. But you have right now. 

That's a whole lot of power. 

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Showing Up - Especially When You Don't Want To

There is magic to showing up. I know this from experience. How many times have I had something in my life that I didn't want to do or regretted signing up for and showed up anyway? How many of those times resulted in a great experience? What would I have missed out on had I not sucked it up and gotten my ass there? Probably a lot. There are friends I wouldn't have, ideas that wouldn't have been born and experiences that would have been missed.

All the times I didn't show up and didn't try - what did I miss out on? What did I neglect to experience? Don't get me wrong - I don't regret my decisions but I do want to learn from them - the good and the bad. I want to tuck them into my quiver of knowledge and pull out the right arrow when it's needed. 

I do want to show up more. And I feel as though I am doing just that this year. This year has been all about showing up. Keeping commitments, especially to myself. I want to feel full without feeling guilty (I mean that literally and figuratively, of course) without fear and shame. Sometimes showing up is the hardest part and that in and of itself is a victory. Just getting out of bed and showering some days = VICTORY.

So now I sit here and type these words and I'm asking myself, "Where can I show up today? Who will I meet? Who will I help? Where will I go?"

Well, there's only one way to find out. 

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Trying It On For Size

Every week my youngest has preschool. It's only for a couple of hours and occurs three days a week. Every time I pick her up from school, you would think that she had been a tour around the world that latest months because of how much she tells me about her day. I hear about the "job" that she had that day (and apparently "line leader" is the most coveted responsibility whereas "napkin passer" isn't as glamorous), the friends that she played with, the letter she learned, the stories her teacher told and the craft she experimented with. For less than three hours, she sure does a lot.

Anyway, these little chats that we have are more than just post-preschool babble with a five year old. They offer me a glimpse into what she find important and interesting. They tell me what gets her blood pumping and that she loves to learn new things. They show me her inner world at a level that I wouldn't get otherwise. Because I'm listening.

Last week, she said something really interesting. I picked her up on Wednesday and on the way home she announced, "I think I'm going to be a little shy on Friday."

This really threw me because Emma is not a shy child. She introduces herself to new children and offers to be their friend right away. As we drive to the library she wonders out loud what new friends she will make when we get there. That's just the way she is. I wonder if I was that way and I became an introvert over time, but I don't remember those days and I'll have to let my mom fill in that blank.

Anyway, her announcement was unusual. I try to be very careful about how I position and phrase things as I've gotten burned by my kids not understanding sarcasm or rhetorical questions. So I paused for a second and then said, "Well, there's nothing wrong with being shy. But I wonder why you think you're going to be shy because you're usually not."

She sat in her car seat thoughtfully and replied, "I just think I'm going to be nervous."

The rest of the drive home was pretty uneventful, all four and a half minutes of it but my brain stayed stuck on this idea that she had posed to me. This idea that a personality is something you can try out for a day or two or that a certain situation requires a different state of being than one would normally find themselves in.

Obviously we all do that. I act one way with my best friend and another with my neighbor that I'm still getting to know. I act one way in casual social settings and another in professional environments. Most of us have this chameleon ability, to blend in and out of certain circles and relationships, to change ourselves even temporarily to "behave" when the stakes are high and "cut loose" when we can just be ourselves.

But this, of course, got me thinking even further. Who am I really? Which of these variations of "me" is truly ME? I began to run my mind in circles to identify what attributes truly defined me and which ones were something that I would just put on and take off as the situation demanded it.

I came up with an answer that works for me at the moment: the real me is the one that exhausts me the least.

Keeping up a facade is exhausting. Juggling the appearance balls is ridiculously overwhelming and can wear me down faster than any exercise I've ever tried in my life. But just being me? That's almost effortless. I don't have to watch what I say, walk on egg shells, or second guess every decision because what I'm doing feels right and goes fairly smoothly. The older I get and the more I pay attention to these things the easier it is for me to identify when I'm being authentic. I am more introverted than extroverted so any kind of interaction with people can wear me out, but it's not as bad when I'm just being myself.

As I write this, I'm now thinking that maybe this has been why I've been so tired lately. We got a new puppy, so yes, that's probably also contributing to the issue, but it still feels more tiring than usual. Am I really being myself? Am I really being authentic? If not, what areas of my life can I infuse with more "me" to bring myself back to center? Definitely something to think about.

Oh, and in case you were wondering, my youngest did not act shy last Friday at school. She actually forgot her plan and was just herself that day. And she had a very good day.

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